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Personal Tax

28 / 05 / 2015 by Greg Freyman, CPA in Personal Tax

Are There Tax Benefits For Holding Property In A Revocable Trust?

Question:
What would be the tax benefits and implication if any of buying a house where the deed is in name of a revocable trust with the husband as the trustee, the wife as successor trustee, and their kids as the beneficiaries? The mortgage is only in the husband’s name?

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20 / 05 / 2015 by Greg Freyman, CPA in Personal Tax

Are Roth IRA Early Withdrawals Always Taxable?

Question:
I’m withdrawing from my Roth IRA before reaching the age of 59 1/2. Is this withdrawal subject to taxes and the 10% early withdrawal penalty?

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20 / 05 / 2015 by Greg Freyman, CPA in Personal Tax

Can I Deduct Educational Expenses For Work?

Question:
I’m employed by a large company and earn around $250,000 per year. In addition, I have about $100,000 in annual business income from consulting that is reported on Schedule C. I attend a college in Chicago, and it is a post-secondary educational facility. Can I claim the education costs on Schedule C, and the out-of-town travel costs associated with my education? I’m receiving mixed answers online for whether or not I can deduct educational expenses for work.

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10 / 02 / 2015 by Greg Freyman, CPA in Personal Tax

Understanding Your W-2 Form

The W-2 form is a document that employers must furnish to their employee(s) by the February 2nd, 2015 for the 2014 tax year. The deadline is generally January 31st, but this year it fell on a Saturday. The IRS and the State will also receive a copy of the form. Furthermore, the taxing authorities will match the information on this W-2 form with the information provided on your tax return. If there are any mismatches, depending on the error, it can automatically trigger an initial rejection of your tax return or a correspondence audit.

As a working individual, you earn income is subject to federal, state, city and payroll taxes (social security & medicare). The amount of income taxes (not payroll) that are withheld throughout the year depends on the information detailed on the federal form W-4 and state form (NYS uses form IT-2104, each state has a different form) that you completed when you commenced work for your employer. Please note that the more exemptions you claim, the less tax withheld for federal and state income tax purposes.

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S Corporation Filings Impact Your Individual Return

One of the most common questions we receive from S Corporation owners is, “Why do I need to file my corporate taxes before I file my individual taxes?”

It’s important for us to first define a subchapter S Corporation (S-Corp). An S-Corp is a “pass through” entity that is generally not subject to federal or state taxes. However, New York City does have an income tax for S-Corps because the city of New York does not recognize the S-Corp status and treats the S-Corp as a regular corporation. There are several other states that also do not recognize the S-Corp status.

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Are There New York City Property Taxes?

I would have to say that it really depends on what kind of property you own and what you intend to do with that property. There are many levels of New York City property taxes, and they all vary by industry and use. Below, I’ve provided some basic guidelines that cover the taxes, fees, and reporting obligations.

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Can I Claim The Standard Mileage Deduction For Vehicle Costs?

Recently, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced the new standard mileage rates to deduct vehicle expenses for the 2015 tax year.  The latest rules impact individuals using a vehicle for business, charity, or medical and moving purposes. With the exception of the costs related to business, the standard mileage rates all stayed the same or were slightly down from 2014 due to lower gas and oil costs.

 

What is the the standard mileage deduction rate for 2015?

For 2015, the standard mileage rate increases to $0.575 for business miles driven, up from $0.56 in 2014 (reference: Internal Revenue Notice 2014-114). While the IRS expects fuel prices to be lower in 2015, an annual study indicated higher fixed and variable costs for operating an automobile, including depreciation, insurance, repairs, tires, and maintenance.

The rate will be $0.23 per mile for medical or moving purposes, down $0.005 from 2014, and $0.14 per mile driven in service of charitable organizations. The medical and moving expenses are based on the lower expected price of oil, while the charitable rate is set by law.

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